Nashville

THE DELTA SAINTS

Dylan Fitch, Ben Azzi, Ben Ringel, David Supica, Greg Hommert

www.thedeltasaints.com

http://emilyjramey.com/2012/07/17/the-delta-saints-bio/

http://emilyjramey.com/2009/09/29/the-delta-saints-pray-on-ep-review/

http://emilyjramey.com/2009/02/16/the-delta-saints-article/

“As if the warm familiar melody of rootsy porch music has been plugged in and turned up: The Delta Saints are driving listeners from the comforting recline of their porch swings right to the edge of their seats. It’s a fusion of traditional southern soul and funk-inspired power, all layered with furious harmonica lines that simultaneously tie the group together and threaten to unseat it all in one sweep. It’s the unsettling sound of strength. A strength fueled by talent and bridled by a passion to relate to another that catches the attention of passers-by with its language-like quality. You can hear within it a conversation between five men able to speak to one another through their instruments.

The essence of the Midwest and the bayou work together to make a sound unique but befitting of Nashville. And the energy that sweats from this gritty howling dynamic is a message heralding love and loss and consequence. And though the songs may end, the intensity generated from the act of something old made new again will hauntingly remain.”

I am crazy about The Delta Saints.  Their music is so dirty, and their live show is almost to much to take in.  The room heats up, and nobody cares.  The combination of harmonica, dobro, and that bluesy old-man-from-the-bayou voice from Ringel are enough to make anybody sweat. The Delta Saints have that uncanny ability to make you feel the music in your body and mind whether you like it or not.  I never miss a show in Nashville.  – EJR



APACHE RELAY

The Apache Relay

www.theapacherelay.com

http://emilyjramey.com/2009/09/28/michael-ford-jr-the-apache-relays-1988-review/

“The Apache Relay takes more long car rides than most bands. But only a portion of their car time is dedicated to their touring schedule — the rest is something like driving in the middle of the night from Nashville to Alabama and back, just to listen to a new record 12 consecutive times. Despite their wagon’s sketchy brakes, this happens a lot. It’s where the indie-roots band discovered a shared love for the timelessness of Motown records, the weight of Springsteen’s Nebraska, the textures of modern rock bands, as well as the intensity of really skilled acoustic players. It’s also where they cemented their bond, spontaneously forming the band after just one gig at Belmont University. Now, just over two years later, The Apache Relay is releasing their second album, American Nomad, a modern and young roots-rock collection produced by Nielson Hubbard.”

Apache Relay is not a difficult pick.  Their killer Americana rock sound is just good music, and the musicians themselves often seem too wrapped up in it to even notice that they’re actually playing for an audience. When observing such a rare occurence – that the band just plays, instead of really ‘performing’ – I like to think it’s because the musicians don’t care about their image; they just can’t stop playing.  And if it’s Apache Relay, you won’t want them to.  – EJR


One thought on “Nashville

  1. Excellent! If I could write like this I would be well pleased. The more I see articles of such quality as this (which is rare), the more I think there could be a future for the Web. Keep on keeping on 🙂

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